Sunday, December 13, 2009

Crawford Lewis Demands a Higher Salary (or to paraphrase "Hey BOE, I want Mine...Now!")

This is beyond comprehension, beyond belief. No STEP increases for teachers, bus drivers get a 29% pay cut, and facilities like Cross Keys are literally falling apart but Superintendent Crawford Lewis says about his salary: '“I am going backwards,” Lewis said Wednesday. “I can’t continue doing this. I am not a rookie anymore.”.

He intentionally forgets to mention that DCSS enrollment has shrunk since he's been superintendent (and that there would be between 1,000 to 2,000 less DCSS students is he and Ron Ramsey ever seriously investigated residency).

Simply unbelievable. He has worked for DCSS for 36 years, will retire with an awesome pension, and has been part of the DCSS decision-making inner circle for much of that time. He has substantially increased the amount of non-classroom related administrators, almost all of whom make well over $100,o00 per year. All that is asked for of these administrators is their blind loyalty to him, not our student bobdy.

This is equally offensive as his ridiculous memo supporting convicted criminal.CRCT test cheater James Berry and the soon to be convicted asst. principal, the low point of his tenure as superintendent.

Check out this article at CrossRoads News.

Earlier this year when DeKalb Schools’ highest paid employees – those making more than $100,000 a year – took a two percent pay cut, Superintendent Crawford Lewis voluntarily took a 2 percent cut even though his contract didn’t require it.

When teachers lost their step increase, Lewis gave up his $10,000 cost of living increase that should have kicked in July 1; and when he met his goals and earned a $22,000 bonus, he only took half of it.

“I felt that if the people I lead have to give up something, let me demonstrate my leadership by joining them,” Lewis said.

The DeKalb School Board, which employs Lewis, is now negotiating his contract amidst shrinking revenues and lots of belt-tightening brought on the economic recession.

At its Dec. 7 meeting, David Schutten, president of the teacher’s union, Organization of DeKalb Educators, signaled to the board that there would be rumblings in the ranks if board members increased Lewis’s pay or benefits while teachers and bus drivers are preparing for more cuts.

“It would send a terrible message to everybody in this county,” he said. “This would create a crisis of confidence beyond anything we have ever seen in the school system.” Schutten said people are under stress and morale is at an all-time low.

“I hope that you are acting in good faith and have the best interest of all employees,” he said. “Think about the message you are sending to the people on the front lines in the school system that have taken cut after cut after cut and are getting ready to take more cuts.”

Lewis, who completed his fifth year as superintendent in October, leads the state’s third-largest school district, behind Gwinnett and Cobb counties.

Board members and Lewis say that he voluntarily gave up $29,000 in pay and bonuses in the last two years out of solidarity with employees and teachers who had to take salary reductions.

When those reductions are factored in, Lewis’ $255,924 package of pay and travel benefits, is really $226,924, which moves him from the third highest paid superientendent to sixth place behind Fulton County’s Cynthia Low, who manages a district with 89,000 students.

Even Clayton County’s superintendent, Edmond Heatley, who has been on the job for five months managing a district that is less than half the size of DeKalb’s makes more – $3,676 – more than Lewis when both men’s package of pay and travel benefits are compared.

“I am going backwards,” Lewis said Wednesday. “I can’t continue doing this. I am not a rookie anymore.”

Board members who completed Lewis’s annual evaluation in October have been meeting behind closed doors about his contract.

Tom Bowen, the board’s chairman, said they should have 2010 goals for Lewis finalized by the end of the month or by January, the latest.

Lewis’ contract, which was extended by a year in March without any financial incentive, now expires October 2011. Bowen said they had to extend it because it is customary for superintendents to have contracts extending 12 to 18 months out.

Lewis said that if it gets to a year and the contract is not extended, superintendents know to start job hunting.

While he had not had any contract discussions with the board, Lewis’s lawyer and board lawyers have spoken.

“They have the eight dimensions I want,” he said.

None of them includes him making less money.

“It’s not reasonable for me to start out with less,” he said. “I am a bargain for this board. I am so underpaid compared to other superintendents.”

Board members are mum on the talks and some expressed surprise at the rumors that Schutten mentioned during his comments at Monday’s board meeting.

“That’s a personnel issue,” said Sarah Copelin-Wood, who represents District 3. “I don’t understand how it gets out in the public arena.”

While she could not comment on the superintendent’s contract discussions, Copelin-Wood said she is a great proponent of the employees and teachers getting a step increase or cost of living raises.

“They have not gotten anything in two years,” she said. They deserve it. Bus drivers, cafeteria workers and custodians are the lowest paid employees in the system. I am in support of them getting their step increase or a cost of living increase.”

Dr. Eugene Walker, the District 9 Board member, said the rumors mentioned by Schutten have no merit.

“I can’t speak for any other board members, but it is inconceivable to me that we would give our superintendent a raise and our teachers have not had a step increase and we have cut bus drivers’ pay by 29 percent,” he said. “This is one board member who would not be party to it. Before we can consider any increase for the superintendent, we would have to increase those making the least amount of money first.”

District 4 board member H.Paul Womack Jr. would not say whether an increase was on the table for Lewis, but he noted that even Clayton County pays its superintendent more than DeKalb pays Lewis.

He said Lewis has performed “admirably and has done an outstanding job.”

“He has brought the school system forward on a lot of high goals,” Womack said. “If we were to lose Dr. Lewis, it would cost us $300,000 easily to replace him.”

Womack, who led a $5.2 billion a year company before he retired, said Lewis would measure up in any company in which he worked.

“Dr. Lewis is worth more than we are paying him,” Womack said. “He sets high goals and he passed every one of them. This community is damn lucky we have Dr. Lewis.”

Lewis, who worked 32 years with the school system before he became superintendent, says he would like to finish his career with DeKalb Schools but he acknowledged that he is being courted regularly by other school systems across the county.

“I believe I can make a difference,” he said, “but that doesn’t mean I am going to continue falling behind.”

138 comments:

Anonymous said...

“I can’t speak for any other board members, but it is inconceivable to me that we would give our superintendent a raise and our teachers have not had a step increase and we have cut bus drivers’ pay by 29 percent,” he said. “This is one board member who would not be party to it. Before we can consider any increase for the superintendent, we would have to increase those making the least amount of money first.”


Wow, for the first time, I agree with Gene Walker on something!!

Anonymous said...

At its Dec. 7 meeting, David Schutten, president of the teacher’s union, Organization of DeKalb Educators

It is incorrect to refer to this organization as a union.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 12:31 stole my thunder. I am not currently a teacher but I taught in another state that had a real teacher's association who negotiated our contract. We didn't just get legal representation, our dues paid for all around service. Those of you who think belonging to a strong teacher's association takes some of the professionalism out of teaching are mistaken. Almost every state with strong teachers' associations have outstanding public schools. Perhaps that's because their teachers get guaranteed 30 minute lunches and other "frills."
Now to Dr. Lewis....all I have to say is, he must be joking.

Anonymous said...

Every single DCSS teacher who doesn't want to be an administrator, the school nurses, the cafeteria workers, the custodians, the bus drivers, etc. are going to lose their mind when they read this article. Crawford Lewis and his ego are simply out of control. He has chosen to increase spending on everything except the classroom and condition of schools. Whether its Yvonne Butler's crazy made up position, the the purchasing of worthless software like eSIS and Crawford's incredible demand for more money, please tell me this has to be the beginning of the end of his tenure in DeKalb.

I just hope the BOE has a sucession plan. Every large organization such as this should always be growing in-house candidates to take the superintendent's place in case he/she leaves on short notice. it's no difference then a sports team grooming its younger players. The BOE has to make sure it always has candidates in place who can step up and take the place of people like Kewis, Turk, Ramsey, Talley, Moseley, etc. Then again, almost anyone could take the place of 9 month work schedule Ron Ramsey.

Anonymous said...

If people are offering Lewis more money, than he should take it. You go into education because you want to make a difference in the lives of kids. If you go into teaching to make a lot of money, than you need to get out.

As an educator for 15 years, and not all in Georgia or DeKalb, I do not begrudge not getting a step increase or a cost of living increase or being furloughed a day. I do begrudge not getting money put into my social security fund and the increase of people making over 100,000 when our schools are crumbling and people are flocking the system.

I know many superintendents in other school systems who show that they care about not only the children but the other employees by their actions. Lewis does not have the respect of the teachers or other employees who really care about the kids. Principals are not showing up to mandatory meetings. Teachers have had enough with the Esis mess, the poorly written Benchmarks, the poorly written math lesson plans, the dirty school buildings, the poor condition of the schools, having to follow America's Choice, emails from Lewis to support liars, etc.

DeKalb cannot afford Lewis on many levels. Given the current economic climate in the county if he is not happy with his salary than let him go. We don't need him. Someone else could boost morale, get rid of the many unneeded administrators, and turn the county around. If we keep the Lewis administration we will continue to loose children.

Anonymous said...

I wholeheartedly agree with the last comment. It is time for a change! Let someone else come in and clean house. The top needs to be cut in half, put monies back into schools-children, salaries, retirement, and facilities. Only then look at the salaries at the district level for those working hard on behalf of our children-not to save their jobs and create unnecessary work for our teachers. eSIS...nightmare that won't end until solutions for current problems make sense

Anonymous said...

36 plus years and now he'd demanding more cash. Even after he was allowed to buy his $18,000 DCSS for only $5,000.

Dude, I'm calling your bluff. if you have other offers, go ahead. You're well paid. Do your job and focus on the students and not all the extraneous stuff like making sure ex-principals get jobs for which they have no business getting.

Anonymous said...

Lewis is such a joke....you layoff employees for a raise.....I could think of many names to call you and your entire administration.....sad, dispecable, selfish, & fired. You just fired yourself from any future with any other school system. Do you really expext anyone to believe that a school system or company would take Lewis serious. Look at all the bad business decisions he's made. There are far too many to recount...and that's just in 2009. He's lame and the worst form of an educator; no morals or value for the students and teachers that educate or bus drivers with the biggest job in the world....transporting our precious cargo safely to and from school. Get rid of Lewis...

Anonymous said...

I strongly disagree. Dr. Lewis is worth every penny we pay him. Dr. Lewis is running a big cooperation.

Anonymous said...

"Dr. Lewis is running a big cooperation."

He sure is. If you cooperate, you get what you want.

Anonymous said...

Lewis and that Pat Pope did the layoffs. That was to help the Budget. How can the board let him get away with this? Do they understand that the people that were lay-off lost their Insurance, Income and a chance to Retire. A large number of those people still don't have JOBS AND THEY HAVE CHILDREN. But then the board has no clue. I often wonder how do these people sleep at night. I Trust that in time this will all come to light.

Cerebration said...

True enough, Anon, but sadly, that is the way it is in every business nowadays. I certainly know plenty of people in other businesses who have lost their jobs - plenty.

Kim Gokce said...

There could be a worse time and a worse tone for this compensation discussion... I just can't think of one. Et tu, Dr. Lewis? I'm discouraged and I do not work there!

Is Lee Iacocca still around?

Anonymous said...

I am sure that being the head of a large school system is a very demanding job. That is not an issue. But all employees have been asked to sacrifice in this very difficult climate. How can bus drivers, custodians, para educators, teachers that work be asked to sacrifice and this not be the case for all DCSS employees. There are more and more demands being placed on the staff in the schools. People need to feel that we are all in this as one group. New insurance rates will start in January. The cost has gone up and the out of pocket cost has also gone up. Is everyone going to get a raise? Please pray that those making the decisions and the request will consider everyone in the DCSS.

Anonymous said...

"Womack said: 'If we were to lose Dr. Lewis, it would cost us $300,000 easily to replace him.'"

Even if that ended up being more than we pay Crawford (and with compensation and discounted vehicles I'm not so sure) wouldn't it be worth a few extra dollars to bring in someone from the outside who might actually put children first, teachers second, and friends & family last?

BTW, see the AJC this morning--the rest of the county government is talking about cutting back in services and staff. In that environment, how dare King Crawford demand a raise?

Anonymous said...

I think Dr. Lewis needs to hold off on his pay increase until there is enough revenue to provide pay raises for all. Still it is interesting that other school systems who are also feeling the same pinch pay so much more. Just out of curiosity I compared some non profit salaries of Atlanta Institutions such as the Zoo and the Museum of Natural History. These Atlanta nonprofits have just a fraction of the budget that DCSS has. Several including the zoo and the natural history museum have higher pay than Dr. Lewis for their leaders. I suppose that in a corporation that has a billion dollar budget you could reasonably pay more than a nonprofit does. If you review the research on student achievement the four most significant factors are:

1. teachers
2. parental involvement and encouragement
3. continuity of the administration, and
4. the school board.

Without fail school systems that keep a superintendent longer than 5 years do better than ones that change superintendents frequently. Part of the reason for this is that with a change in superintendents everything starts a new and most often the baby gets thrown out with the bath water. We Americans place too much emphasis on simple quick fixes rather than do the work necessary to make things work in the long haul. If you think firing 1 person or 100 will fix DCSS then you are in for a life of disappointment. The challenge is much greater than that. Cost cutting may help us but in the long haul we need to spend more money as well. No one SPLOST will produce enough revenue to fix our buildings and meet our capital improvement needs.

Incidentally, on the fourth significant factor-school boards-countries where there are no school boards out perform countries that have them.

Cerebration said...

True, Anon. The same thinking applies to schools. Schools with consistent leadership - principals - do much better over the years. Dr. Lewis has just given Lakeside our 4th principal in the last 6 years. He should practice what you preach.

Anonymous said...

"Several including the zoo and the natural history museum have higher pay than Dr. Lewis for their leaders."
With all due respect, and meaning nothing against you personally, this sort of argument--and you're not the only one to make it--misses a very important point: performance.
Crawford Lewis is not worth what he gets paid now. He most certainly does not deserve a raise. If he is threatening to seek employment elsewhere we need to see that as an opportunity, not a threat.

Cerebration said...

The board has not renewed his contract. They all seem to agree that most supers have contracts that are good for 12-18 months out. This board has guaranteed Lewis a job through Oct 2011 (22 months out). I think it is the board sending the message, not Lewis. They will endorse and keep him long enough for him to retire nicely. Pretty generous as is, IMO.

I'm not certain what goals they have set and are judging him by, but here are a few of mine, which he has not passed muster on.

A systemwide AYP passing grade. (in 2008, we passed AYP for all students overall academic performance, but failed in sub-categories - in 2009, we failed for students overall. This is going backward and should not be rewarded.)

High teacher morale.
Low rate of using long-term substitute teachers.
Technology (computers, internet, Promethean boards, etc) available in equity to all schools.
Science lab and other equipment available in equity to all schools.
Band equipment available in equity to all schools.
Sports equipment available in equity to all schools.
Clean restrooms with working toilets in all schools.
Few or no trailers.
An accounting of empty/unused buildings with financial plans to keep or sell and why.
No new money spent on new schools - or arts centers - until every school is in excellent condition.
Enrollment balancing - make the tough decisions, now - before we run out of money.

Cerebration said...

Dr. Lewis claims to want to be data driven. Here is some of the data regarding AYP for our high schools - which are in a crisis, IMO.

Avondale
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005-No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

Cedar Grove
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005-No
2006 - No
2007 - Yes
2008 - No
2009 - No

Chamblee Charter HS (includes magnet high achievers)
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - Yes

Clarkston HS
2003-No
2004-No
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - Yes

Columbia
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

Cross Keys
2003-No
2004-No
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - Yes
2009 - No

DSA (Magnet School for the Arts with tests for admission - 284 students grades 8-12)
2003-Yes
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - Yes

Druid HIlls HS
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - Yes

Dunwoody
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - No
2009 - No

Lakeside
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - No
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - Yes

Lithonia
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - Yes
2008 -No
2009 - No

ML King HS
2003-Yes
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

McNair HS
2003-Yes
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

Miller Grove
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - Yes
2008 - No
2009 - Yes

Open Campus (Eliz Andrew)
2003-Yes
2004-No
2005-No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

Redan
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - Yes

SW DeKalb
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - Yes
2009 - No

Stephenson
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - Yes
2007 - No
2008 - Yes
2009 - No

Stone Mountain
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- No
2006 - Yes
2007 - Yes
2008 - No
2009 - No

Towers
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- No
2006 - No
2007 - No
2008 - No
2009 - No

Tucker HS
2003-No
2004-Yes
2005- Yes
2006 - No
2007 - Yes
2008 - No
2009 - No

Anonymous said...

Anon 10:26 AM, Crawford Lewis has been superintendent for four years, but he has also been part of the inner circle of management for decades. Just as he should receive credit for all of the positives of the last 10 years, he should also receive criticism for all of the negatives. And the negatives are stacking up, and is instances of his poor judgement, such as the letter defending James berry. His leadership for the eSIS outlay was lacking to say the least. No other single thing has caused such a decrease in productivity across the board for teachers and asst. principals. We are talking about thousands of wasted hours trying to work with software which should have had a trial rollout at a few schools before bringing it system-wide. My son's teacher has been brought to tears because of eSIS problems.

Crawford Lewis has done some nice things, but his perfomance overall has been lacking. It's well past time for not only a new superintendent, but a complete overhall of upper management.

His asking for higher pay during these very tough economic times is callous and counter-productive. If he has other job offers, please go ahead and go!

Anonymous said...

Enrollment has shrink considerably since he's been super, and he wants more dough, while cutting bus drivers salary 29%?? Even if he is deserving, he picked the worst time possible to try to bully the board for more money.

Cerebration said...

"“I am going backwards,” Lewis said Wednesday. “I can’t continue doing this. I am not a rookie anymore.”

The same can certainly be said for many of our teachers and bus drivers.

Anonymous said...

A school superintendent's salary isn't comparable with that of a zoo or museum director. A large part of the job of the leader of a nonprofit is to raise funds. Pressure for performance is built in because if he or she fails to bring in money, the organization won't have money to pay him.

If another school district offers Dr. Lewis more, let him go. If not, the market is telling us there is no need for us to pay him more.

Anonymous said...

AYP isn't a very good measure. In theory someday it should be at 100%. That means all students with learning disabilities, all students that are English language learners, all the students who miss more than 15 days of school will pass. If it gets to that point it will be meaningless. (Unless you are in Lake Woebegone where all the students are above average.) We have a system where 9% of our students are absent more than 15 days and over one third are absent 6 days or more. Our graduation rate as figured by the state (we need a nationally accepted formula for this) has risen to within .3% of the state average. The DCSS graduation rate for students with disabilities exceeds the state graduation rate. The graduation rate for English Language or limited English proficient learners under Dr. Lewis has risen from 35% to 54%. When Dr. Lewis took over only 40% of our special Ed students were mainstreamed in a classroom (80% of their time in a regular classroom)-the state goal was 55%. Since then the number of special Ed students in regular classrooms has increased to 53%. Meanwhile the state goal has increase to 61%. We are still behind but have narrowed the gap.

Cerebration said...

I see your point as far as looking at improvements within certain groups Anon, however, a 54% graduation rate for ESOL students and a 30.6% graduation rate for Students with Disabilities is not something to be wildly proud of. This is where we are right now - in the year 2009. Sad, really.

If you pick and choose, you will surely find pockets of positive news, however, this school system as a whole has yet to meet AYP and no matter how you view it, it is the measurement used by the state and federal governments, so it cannot be dismissed.

Nice try though.

Anonymous said...

Nice to hear that some good things were happening with special education students.

Would be even better to hear that some good things were happening with DeKalb Alternative School students, instead of hearing about how completely out of control it is. And it really is.

Anonymous said...

Yes, more special education students are being mainstreamed, but they are also receiving less services. In my school dyslexic children are getting modified work in the regular education classroom instead of quality instruction that can help them to learn how to read fairly well. We are ignoring our special education students' needs and not giving them what the instruction that they need to succeed for a life time.

Beware of looking at just the numbers. You need to look at the facts behind the numbers.

Cerebration said...

Beyond the numbers, there are also character issues about Lewis that bother me. There's the letter he sent out countywide asking every employee to support the principal who had the audacity to change answers on his students tests to make himself look good -- there's the fact that he hired a retired judge to investigate bullying at Dunaire after Jaheem Herrera's suicide - paying her what may amount to nearly a half-million dollars, only to have them claim her findings as attorney-client privilege. There's the way he mishandled the opportunity to open a military academy - literally driving the marines off the negotiating table due to their lack of confidence in our system being able to pull it off (in a teeny-tiny elementary school with no gym!) There are serious discipline issues arising out of our alternative high school - where 30 students are thought to have descended upon Decatur HS in some kind of gang event - causing that principal to put the school in lock-down. There's the delay, dismissal, disrespect paid to our majority Hispanic high school, Cross Keys - which is in such a state of decay that the health department would surely shut it down if they would investigate. There's the continual increase in bloat at the top in this administration - costing taxpayers far more for our top-heavy salaries than other metro systems (except Atlanta PS). There's the horrible roll-out of the untested eSis system. There's the out of control spending on legal issues that should never have ballooned into the big deals they have become. There's even the decision to spend over $3.5 million for a study to decide how much to actually counter-sue Heery/Mithchell for (arriving at a ridiculous number between $85-120 million). And there's the hiring of Pat Pope with full knowledge of her relationship and partnership with a big supplier of architectural services - and then, in the end, asking for an "investigation" into her - after she allowed him to purchase a car from supply for 1/3 value and getting caught.

There's just this laundry list that doesn't seem to come clean -- and it bothers me - regardless of whether or not he has mainstreamed more special ed kids.

Anonymous said...

Please Superintendent Lewis, please take one of the other job offers, And please, please take Tony Hunter and eSIS with you!!! And take the principals who don't want to teacher or be principals anymore, like Yvonne Butler. And take all the DCSS administrators who got their jobs because they are related to someone, like the Guillory's.

Anonymous said...

Cerebration, you should publish your comment in the AJC. Very strong, very thorough argument.

Anonymous said...

Inclusion for many special ed students in DeKalb is a joke. Most teachers (both regular and special ed) aren't trained properly.

For high functioning special ed students, especially those that are normal cognitively, mainstreaming can indeed be a blessing and work well. However, for a child who cowers in the corner day in and day out in a classroom with no many students for that student to find success and learning, mainstreaming is a failure.

I think high school principals have figured out how to game the drop out rate system -- when a student simply disappears they don't mark them as a drop out, but rather "presume" they are continuing their education, even though no school ever sends for their records.

Since Dr. Lewis took over, the rules for testing ESOL students have changed. No longer are the test scores of brand new immigrants counted, rather ESOL students get one year in an American school (which, by the way, isn't long enough) before their scores count. Additionally, ESOL students are now monitored the year after they are discharged and I believe those scores are included in the ESOL group as well.

Special ed rules have changed as well. We aren't comparing apples to apples here.

(Lewis isn't responsible for the rules changing, Kathy Cox is. She needs for things to look better than they are. She has to keep her job.)

Anonymous said...

He said Lewis has performed “admirably and has done an outstanding job.”

“He has brought the school system forward on a lot of high goals,” Womack said. “If we were to lose Dr. Lewis, it would cost us $300,000 easily to replace him.”

Why would Womack support giving Lewis a raise? It's simple - you scratched my back and now I'll scratch yours. Lewis did Womack a big one by bypassing policy on hiring the latest principal at Lakeside. Womack owes him one; payback that if Lewis get his wish, we all will be paying for. Let's hope the rest of the BoE doesn't owe Lewis a return favor, if they do we're sunk.

Anonymous said...

Anon 9:45--very astute. You must have been reading my mind. Womack was bragging in the community that he "got Joe Reed hired" at Lakeside, and given that it happened without the input of the school council, it was obvious that he got it directly from Lewis. These guys are one big lovefest. They need each other to keep afloat.

Anonymous said...

Lewis wants a raise, what about the bus drivers?. If the drivers
don't pick up the kids then no one would have a job. They get the schools started everyday. You pay those admin. all that money let them drive the buses and maybe Lewis could drive also. That is not a easy job, they have a great deal of stress to deal with. As a parent, drivers and teachers should be first on the list for a raise.

It's time for the system to bring new people in that don't owe favors.

Cerebration said...

Some of the most wonderful, caring people in DCSS happen to be bus drivers. They deserve more special treatment. I really appreciated the ones my children had.

Anonymous said...

Furloughs appear to be in the works for educators for the spring due to the shortage of funds in the state. So, it would appear that everyone is going to suffer even more.

Other School Supers have made staff aware that furloughs are probable coming again from the legislature and the governor. Apparentely there is such a shortage of money that they do not have a choice.

Anonymous said...

I over heard from my principal that Feb. 16 (the Tuesday after presidents day) was going to be another unpaid furlough day for DCSS staff.

I wished that they would go ahead and say. I could go ahead and apply at my second job to help make up for the wages lost.

But, knowning DCSS they will wait til the last minute.

Anonymous said...

People, there is plenty of money to avoid furloughs, but Crawford lewis has made the decision to build up a massive amount of high paid administrators. Don't blame the state gov't. Blame Crawford Lewis for massive amounts of non-classroom spending.

Anonymous said...

since we're illustrating WHY he does NOT deserve a raies, I'd like to point out my little bone of contention.
During the Sept/Oct "Crawford Lewis Road Show," when he went to each neighborhood parent council unit to talk about change and upcoming year, the "absolutely gonna happen" school closings he told Pat Pope to choose, etc., he brought quite an entourage. He even referred to them as "my cabinet." essentially, he required full Admin staff to be on deck with him at these meetings, and apparently, he required all the principals from each cluster to attend the meeting in their area when he spoke.
At salaries of $100K+ per year, how much do you think it cost us for him to go to each of the meetings with such an entourage?

Cerebration said...

That whole area is a big mess. The school system keeps very poor data. We have been tracking enrollment data (provided by DCSS) for quite some time and it's always in a flux - especially capacity numbers.

To read more on the subject, check out our post called,
The Enrollment Numbers Game

We have plans to do similar research on the buildings and property (closed and unused) owned by the system. They don't seem to know this information either.

Anonymous said...

Massive amounts of paid admininstrators?

According to the most recent data available DCSS has 541 full time administrators as counted by the state definition (and this includes principals and assistant principals in 141 schools and centers. Every school has at least two administrators, one principal and one assistant principal, and larger schools have more than one assistant principal. Altogether there are 436 principals and assistant principals in DCSS or (436/541) 81% of DCSS full time administrators are in the schoolhouse. (Source GADOE http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ReportingFW.aspx?PageReq=102&StateId=ALL&T=1&FY=2008)

That leaves 105 positions for (asterisk denote more than one administrator)
*Athletics
*ELL (mandated by Fed and State)
*Special Ed (again mandated),
Food Service
Career Tech
*Transportation
*Operations
*MIS,
*Finance
*Student Health Services (nurses)
*HR
*Purchasing
*Staff Development (mandated by NCLB)
*Safety
Discipline
*Counseling
Research and Evaluation
Grants
Media (library)
*Instructional Services, Directors of elementary, middle and high schools and content coordinators of math, science English, AP, IB, social studies, world languages, Kindergarten, Health and PE Choral Music, Art, and Band). Core instructional services such as math, science, and English Language Arts may include more than one coordinator in each division.
*There are also Title I positions mandated by the Fed.
Finally there is a deputy superintendent, two associate superintendent, 6 and regional superintendents.

Anonymous said...

I can not believe that you believe everything you read in the newspapers-of course http://crossroadsnews.com
is the definitive source of truth. He took the pay cut when everyone else did. Let's see what transpires before we heat up the tar, find the rail and gather the feathers.

Molly said...

Anon 3:25 - do you have numbers for the various categories of administrators?

I find it curious that there is only one administrator for discipline, and just one for research and evaluation while we have multiple administrators for athletics. Discipline (or lack thereof) affects every child in the system. Research and evaluation likewise should impact the curriculum and teaching in every classroom. Athletics on the other hand is limited to middle and high schools, and only to those students who opt to participate. It looks like our priorities are out of order.

Anonymous said...

Anon 3:25, you're numbers are way, way, way off. There are so many more administrators and "managers".

Cerebration said...

Here's a repost from an earlier report on a board meeting. I don't know if you consider these folks "administration", but I do. I think our money is always better spent on qualified teachers - and plenty of them.

It really bothers me to hear Dr. Lewis fret over the fact that a full time classroom teacher is a $65,000 expense (including benefits) and then turn around and promote people into high paying administrative jobs. It bothers me that this board plans to request a waiver of the law that requires 65% of the budget to be spent in the classroom and one that would put more students in each of those classrooms. It bothers me that in the area of curriculum, we have our Asst Superintendent of curriculum, Gloria Talley, with her salary of $162,648.00 - 5 directors of curriculum instruction at a cost of $438,500.00, 72 "Instructional Supervisors" at a cost of almost $6.4 million - plus 473 "Instructional Specialists" totaling $23.9 million, yet we have children who do not have art, music and PE teachers - they're entitled to one of each - they shouldn't have to choose. I am bothered by the fact that our superintendent and board seem to cry "poor" when it comes to funding the classroom, but can always find the money to bloat the administration. Our children deserve better.

Cerebration said...

And as always, I refer you to Kim and Ella's report (click on Mr. Potatohead) for an in-depth look at DeKalb's administrative costs compared to others.

Is DeKalb as Bloated as Mr Potatohead?

Anonymous said...

Dr. Lewis is running a big corporation-straight into the ground!

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 3:29 ....

Lewis only took the 2% cut because several board members TOLD him he had to. I have that from a board member. He was not going to take the cut because he has a different contract than the rest of the employees. The board members said it would be a slap in the face to those who took it if he didn't. Same for the BONUS cut, I'm sure. How can he accept bonuses in good conscience when everyone else is getting cut? Also, why is he getting bonuses when the district is in the state that it is? Something tells me that the board is setting the bar far too low. Funny...I thought this year's theme for administrators was RAISE THE BAR.

Anonymous said...

Found out where Pat Pope is working. You are not going to beleive this. The DCSS New Wellness Center. She has an office there or right next door now.

Anonymous said...

As a parent this makes me sick, between the over paid admin. corruption, lieing, nepotism and now Lewis wants more money our children don't have a chance. If Lewis wants more money and can do better let him go. PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE GO.

The Teachers, Bus Drivers are two of the most needed people in the system, and they are last on the list. We have all those admin. yet our schools are doing without.

Parents we need to remember this when election comes around. Our Board Members let these things happen. I have never heard so much mess in all the years I have lived in Dekalb. I really hate we lost Dr. Brown, we can thank our board for that.

Cerebration said...

Regarding the instructional specialists - consider this: there are many more instructional specialists per teacher (about 1:14) than teachers to students (about 1:18 or more).

Anonymous said...

I think it's worth noting that I have been teaching in a DCSS high school for three years and have never once seen, heard, or emailed an instructional specialist or supervisor. Not once. Where are they? What are they doing?

Anonymous said...

I know of one Supervisor who works on one of the many side jobs. I have been here 9 years and only hear from my supervisor once a year at county meetings. When you try to call them their voice mail is always full and they never answer emails.

GET RID OF THESE PEOPLE. I CAN'T TAKE WORKING SO HARD TO MAKE THEM LOOK GOOD ANYMORE!!!!!!

Anonymous said...

“Anon 3:25, you're numbers are way, way, way off. There are so many more administrators and "managers".

Saying I am off doesn’t make it so. I cited my source for the official state verified figures found on the state department of education report card. You can find it at http://www.doe.k12.ga.us/ReportingFW.aspx?PageReq=102&CountyId=644&T=1&FY=2009

By the way- I don’t have the individual figures for all the departments I just marked the ones I knew had more than one position. Research probably does have several positions. There are also probably some departments I missed. For instance, I think there are also positions in media and government relations and in the foundation.

Instructional specialists to my knowledge meet with lead teachers who act as department chairs in each school- science specialists with lead science teachers, etc and provide training. Most teachers see an instructional specialist at staff development. I have a hard time believing that any teacher hasn’t met one after three years?

There are definite not 1 instructional specialist for every 14 teachers.

You may have misunderstood the data-it says there is one administrator for every 14 teachers. This is based on the 2007-2008 data- the 2008-2009 data should be available soon. If you want to compare:

Atlanta Schools 1 administrator for every 8 teachers

Clayton County 1 administrator for every 14 teachers

DCSS 1 administrator for every 14 teachers

Henry County 1 administrator for every 15 teachers

Gwinnett 1 administrator for every 17 teachers


Generally the schools with the higher percentage of Title I schools have more mandated administrators paid through Federal funds.

Anonymous said...

that's really 1 to 13-sorry for the typo

Cerebration said...

Check back a couple of comments, Anon - here's what I quoted -

$162,648.00 - 5 directors of curriculum instruction at a cost of $438,500.00, 72 "Instructional Supervisors" at a cost of almost $6.4 million - plus 473 "Instructional Specialists" totaling $23.9 million.

So that's a total of 545 Instructional Specialists and supervisors (didn't count the 5 directors) - for what - 7500 teachers? That's one Instructional person for every 13.76 teachers. Thus the 1:14 ratio - JUST for Instructional Specialists -- not including any other administrators.

Cerebration said...

Even if you don't count the 73 supervisors - you have 473 Instructional Specialists and would get a ratio of 1 Instructional Specialist for every 16 teachers.

Anonymous said...

Many of these individuals are Title One and Special Education Lead Teacher. It may be a little unfair to classify them in this category. Things are not always the way they look.

Cerebration said...

I didn't list them with the title, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST P-8 - that's the way they are listed in the state records. I don't know why the school system would purposely mislabel employees. Go to http://www.open.georgia.gov/ and find DCSS under Salaries and Travel Reimbursements and then download the file and reshuffle it by job title (alphabetically) - there are 473 people with the job title " INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST P-8 " and they make from $1024 (part-time?) to in the 80s. Many of the additional 72 instructional supervisors make over $100k.

There's another category called "IS PERSONNEL - SUPPORT SERV" - not sure what these 69 people do -- anyone know? How about the 23 people labeled, "IS PERSONNEL - INSTRUCTION SERV "?

Cerebration said...

ps - there are specific job titles listed in special education as well - so these are not the same people as the instructional specialists --

SPECIAL ED PARAPRO/AIDE
SPECIAL EDUCATION
SPECIAL EDUCATION COUNSELOR
SPECIAL EDUCATION DIRECTOR
SPECIAL EDUCATION INTERRELATED (these are teachers and there are 746 of them)
SPECIAL EDUCATION NURSE
SPECIAL EDUCATION SECRETARY/CLERK
SPECIAL EDUCATION SPECIALIST (this must be what you are thinking of Anon - this is a completely different category - there are 86 people with this title)
SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST
TEACHER OF SEVERE INTELLECTUAL
TEACHER OF OTHER HEALTH IMPAIRED
TEACHER OF SPECIFIC LEARNING
TEACHER OF VISUALLY IMPAIRED

Cerebration said...

We also have 108 people with the label "STAFF DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST" - is that different from an Instructional Specialist? It's a separate category.

Cerebration said...

So you see, Anon, sometimes things really are exactly how they look - the thing is - no one looks. That's what we're here for.

Anonymous said...

Waste is waste, however it is paid for.

In my school we have 2 special ed teachers who have students who are included. Both have an aide. One has 4 kids and the other has at max 6 kids. This is outrageous and a waste of money. Especially since the children aren't getting needs met. Simply giving them less work isn't inclusion.

In the three years that I have worked in DCSS, I haven't interacted with an educational specialist, other than the special ed supervisor for my school (not sure the technical term of her titles, as there are so many that float around.

DCSS has too many administrators - plain and simple. These people don't interact with the kids and aren't making DCSS a better school district.

Cerebration said...

On another note- it looks like we're losing coaches as well - (From the Champion)
Two high school coaches leaving DeKalb

Two DeKalb County high school football coaches took other jobs this week outside the county.

Chamblee coach Michael Collins accepted an offer Dec. 15 to become the head coach at Wheeler High School and M.L. King’s Corey Jarvis was named the new head football coach at Duluth High School on Dec, 16.

Dunwoody Mom said...

cere, it's my understanding that one of the main reasons that the Chamblee coach quit was due to lack of facilities. They have no separate practice facilities - they practice on the baseball fields. Even if they had the money to build a separate facility, which I'm sure CCHS boosters could come up with, there is no land to build such a facility.

Anonymous said...

Something like 6 football coaches are leaving already and there will probably be more changes as positions begin to get filled state wide (or at the college level even). It is like dominoes. My understanding is that when the Valdosta job is filled, things will really start moving state wide.

The problem in DeKalb is the revenue sharing, plain and simple.
The Chamblee booster club absolutely could not raise the funds to build better facilities, even if the land was available. If schools got to keep even some of the gate revenues, booster clubs could be free to do things like that, but right booster clubs are strapped just paying for the basics.

There is a chance that more than 1/2 of DeKalb high schools will have new head football coaches next year (we are already at a third).

DeKalb has become a great first head coaching job. But it is a shame, because many DCSS players need football as a stepping stone to college. Without consistency in coaching, this is much harder to accomplish.

Anonymous said...

Dun Mom- this is the second football coach CCHS has lost. Two years ago after going all the way to the state semi-championship, the football coach was hired away by a north metro suburban school. That school had fabulous facilities and a very well funded booster club.

Both Druid Hills and Chamblee are land locked and I expect the athletic programs suffer as a result.

Dunwoody Mom said...

The Chamblee booster club absolutely could not raise the funds to build better facilities, even if the land was available

Sure they could. There a many, many CHS alum out there who would contribute to get it done. I know, I'm one of them.

Anonymous said...

CCHS has real land limitations. This has been known for years. They do however have a great stadium, and if DCSS would step-up and "astro"turf it like they did Hallford Stadium then Chamblee players could practice there without the threat of ruining the field. How about it DeKalb? Isn't this a practical solution to a legitimate problem?

Anonymous said...

The problem is that booster clubs are busy paying for things like proper helmets that at other schools are provided by the school system or covered by the school's gate receipts. Keep in mind that all Cobb, Fulton, and Gwinett schools have their own stadiums.

DeKalb schools aren't even allowed to sell banners to hang on the fences at the football games. Some schools have gotten around this by buying easel type signs, but it is sure is a lot of work for the booster clubs.

DCSS continues to reward mediocrity in the way athletics are run. Doesn't matter if a school sells out the stadium every Friday night or if they have 7 fans there -- all schools are treated the same.

You had better believe at Northview and Norcross etc, those booster clubs are motivated to fill the stadium.

Kim Gokce said...

While I understand the frustration with revenue sharing (central office re-distributes all receipts) at schools with big-time football programs, I have to ask what is the solution, then?

Are we really saying that the poor districts simply have to do without most team athletics because they can't fill a football stadium? That is the reality for Cross Keys and others.

Without the revenue sharing, there would be no football at Cross Keys, and probably no baseball or softball either.

If this is to be resolved, it will only happen with the transformation of our high school map to about half its current number. Then, the poor, working class, middle, and upper class kids would all be crammed into buildings serving wide areas with 2-3 thousand enrollment and plenty of home-grown boosters.

Dunwoody and Chamblee combined make an average enrollment in Gwinnett HSs. Cross Keys, Druid Hills and Clarkston combine make up one. Perhaps the current planning going on will be this bold but I have my doubts.

In the meantime, i don't see a way around the frustrating reality of DeKalb athletics.

Dunwoody Mom said...

Why are booster clubs paying for equipment? I thought DCSS pays for those type of things? I certainly have seen items on the BOE agenda related to authorizing payment.

Anonymous said...

Yes. We have to many high schools. It needs to be fixed. Maybe not so that they are the size of Gwinnett but it needs to be addressed. Athletics are the least of it. Our high schools can't offer the same range of courses, especially electives but also some academics, that larger schools can.

Anonymous said...

DeKalb has three quarters of a million people. There are a plethora of sponsorship and revenue generating possibilities for DCSS Athletics. Even if the centralized system remains, there are so many revenue producing possibilities out there it's sad they are ignored.

The major problem is the current leadership of DCSS Athletics. Mr. Seebree is a nice person and was a good coach, but simply isn't qualified to run a large metro school system athletics dept. We need to stp having former principals and former football coaches with no education in the field or experience in sports administration. The DCSS athletic program is large enough to hire an administrator from a college athletics dept. to run it. A competent, experienced, and educated in the field administrator would be able to run the program much more efficient;y and generate much more revenue.

And if you're unfamiliar with DCSS athletics, its a program where a few football and basketball coaches call all the shots and hold sway over the entire program. Remember the article about the basketball facilities and weight room at the new Tucker High? That's one of the coaches that calls the shots. And he is getting fantastic facilities while some schools like Cross Keys literally have large holes in their gym.

Another major issue is all DCSS athletic facilities. Th athletics dept. should be in charge of every athletic facility. Principals have absolutely zilch experience of knowledge of athletic facilities (even though many have an oversized ego's and think they know every type of facility). Seebree doesn't know anything about athletic facilities. And he doesn't want to learn now.

Principals should be able to schedule athletic facilities during the school day for health and physical education class, after that, it needs to be the sole purviews of a competent, experienced athletic director.

We have many athletic facilites that are in poor shape from very poor maintenance by the Sam Moss Center. A competent, experienced administrator would improve these facilities, and be able to generate rental revenue from the summer and off season. For schools that are land locked, there are partnership opportunities with the county and city parks & rec departments. Cross Keys is fairly close to Chamblee, and has a huge area for more athletic fields that could be shared with Chamblee. Cross Keys has a baseball filed that has received flat out incompetent care form the school system, when it's in a great location and a number of adult baseball leagues and youth sport associations are desperate to find fields to rent.

There are many solvable problems with DCSS Athletics, but the athletic program will continue to be less than mediocre with on Seebree as director and Crawford Lewis as his supervisor.

Cerebration said...

For anyone who has never seen it, Anon is right, Cross Keys has abundant space. It's a mess - but there's a lot of it. They have a running track and field, but you just may break your ankle if you tried to run the track, since it's full of cracks and tufts of weeds to trip on.

Compare that to what Tucker will soon have - or Arabia. Once again, we are totally out of balance, with some people getting far over the top more than others. Why? IMO - it's to create discord and cause us to scrap and fight amongst ourselves. I lay down my arms in that mission and call for us ALL to demand that the SPLOST funding be spent equitably with the goal for 2010 to be that NO school suffer in need. NONE. We have a hundred million dollars IN THE BANK waiting to be spent. Now - what is their motivation for not spending it - and is it actually legal to leave it sitting and sitting an sitting - while they claim to have it "spent" on projects that have yet to actually begin.

Think about it -- what would be the motivation to not spend this giant wad of cash? Keep your eye on the man behind the curtain - do not let him cause us to fight amongst ourselves. Band together and call him out. (The entire board in fact.)

Dunwoody Mom said...

It has been suggested that an "Arabia Mountain" type facility be built in the north part of the county - sounds good to me. How "off-the-wall" is this?

1. Utilize the Cross Keys site for this new facility (as others have suggested).
2. Temporarily move the Cross Keys student body, Technical School as well, to the Chamblee HS facility.
3. Disband the magnet program at Chamblee, or if we must have a High School Magnet program, move it to a school that needs those extra bodies to stay open.
4. Moving or dismantling the magnet program would allow the space for the Cross Keys students.
5. Once the new HS is built, merge Chamblee and Cross Keys into this facility. Rename it Chamblee/Cross Keys Academy.
6. Utilize the CHS site for something else - not sure what - I'm still thinking on that.

Cerebration said...

Great idea, DM. Actually, Chamblee is scheduled to receive an auditorium and Cross Keys is not - so that could be built on the Cross Keys property (which has over 37 acres vs Chamblee's 14 acres).

I think to add to that idea, we need to envision some kind of unusual campus - more like a college type campus - on the Druid Hills property (now all closed, but also housing Adams Stadium). We could build a really nice performing arts high school in one building, and a magnet science/tech hs (could still call it Chamblee I guess) in another... maybe a third type of magnet -- medical maybe? Lots of space on this property as well.

Sell the Chamblee property - it's landlocked, and in a horrible location - hard to get to - lots of traffic congestion.

Dunwoody Mom said...

cere, I really like your idea about the N. Druids Hills campus.

I'm still trying to get in my mind where that auditorium at Chamblee is going to go. Is the plan to add a 3rd floor?

Cerebration said...

I sure don't know where they plan to build it - haven't seen a drawing. In fact, I have a project sheet pulled by Pat Pope back in June that says the budget for Chamblee is $11,119,990.00 - of which, 99.71% is still unspent.

Cerebration said...

And yes, it's true, we have many high schools which are under-enrolled. We surely need to consolidate some of these.

Check out the most recent high school enrollment and capacity numbers published by the county which includes the October, 2009 official FTE count.

School Enrollment and Capacity

An overview of current HS enrollments:

Arabia - 1011
Avondale - 640
Cedar Grove - 1188
Chamblee - 1512
Clarkston - 1007
Columbia - 1302
Cross Keys - 908
Druid Hills - 1406
Dunwoody - 1511
E Andrews (Open Campus) - 615
Lakeside - 1721
Lithonia - 1510
MLK - 1851
McNair - 1042
Miller Grove - 1656
Redan - 1440
DSA - 291 (merged w/Avondale)
Stephenson - 1832
Stone Mt - 1352
SW DeKalb - 1794
Towers - 1014
Tucker - 1419

TOTAL HS enrollment OCT 09: 28,022

Cerebration said...

Lest we forget that we have these other facilities - not counted in the above numbers -

1. DECA (Early College)
2. DeKalb Alternative
3. DeKalb Night School
4. DeKalb Transition
5. DeKalb Truancy
6. International Center

Cerebration said...

According to the CIP High School Classroom addition plans, by 2016, the largest HS will be MLK with a capacity of 2,174 and second, SW DeKalb with a capacity of 2,095. Lakeside will be the third largest high school in the county, with a capacity of 1,943.

Others include;
Dunwoody - increasing to 1633
Chamblee increasing to 1474
Miller grove - 1643
Towers - 1342

Very interesting increases in capacity for a school system that seems to be shrinking.

Anonymous said...

It is mind boggling that Crawford wants to cram in 1900+ students into Lakeside when the entire facility needs a complete top to bottom renovation. I've seen all of our high schools, and yes, Cross Keys is in the worst shape, but the entire Lakeside property is in need and way to small to add any more students.

Cere has a great point about the track at Cross Keys. There are so few tracks in our large county. They can be used by all ages, but especially for adults over 50 for walking and jogging. Only one in five DeKalb households have a child in the county school system. Why not work with the county parks & rec. dept. to have a nice running track open to the public summer, nights and weekends? It is a crime to waste what should be a nice running track open to all county residents.

It's been said he before many times: If you haven't ever been to Cross Keys, please go visit. The grounds are a disaster, a true embarassment to every single employee of the Sam Moss Center. But the inside of the school is even worse. Crawford Lewis and every member of the Board of Education is failing every Cross Keys student and family. It has to be the worst school facility in the state, or at least in the top 3. It is beyond unprofessional for Superintenedent Lewis to allow such miserable learning conditions while he spent tens of millions on Arabia High and Tucker High, and Arabia was a bait and switch; it's not serving its purpose to relieve overcrowding.

Shame on you Crawford Lewis. Shame on you Board of Education members.

Cerebration said...

The planning and forecasting dept posted high school enrollment at a total of 28,251 in their Sept 08 student population report. (It's the racial breakdown report, which states that the system was 79.5% African-American, 9.2% white, 5.8% Hispanic, 3.3% Asian and 2.2% other)

The 2007 HS population totaled 28,861.

The most recent report says 28,022. And since 07, we've opened Arabia, and will soon open the new Tucker HS. In addition, we added classrooms at SW DeKalb and other schools - and have plans to add a huge wing to Lakeside. But enrollments are still the same or trending down.

Wouldn't just rebalancing do the trick? Consolidate and rebalance? For example, is it financially wise to add a wing to Lakeside to accommodate transfer students when we have empty seats in several other high schools? Can we just find out what these schools need to do to entice students to stay? We need to ensure that ALL of our schools are great schools.

Cerebration said...

But then again -- these were the 2006 predictions from the demographer's report -

High School Attendance Areas
By the early to mid part of the next decade the high school enrollment for the district is projected to be approximately 4,500 students above instructional capacity. To remedy this situation the district should strongly consider building new high school
facilities and /or expanding several of the current high school buildings where land and logistics permit. The area with the greatest need for this expanded capacity is the east/east central section of the district and the north/ north east (Dunwoody- Tucker-Lakeside) region.

Anonymous said...

All of your comments and concerns are valid. Let's just watch the agenda for the January Board meeting...word has it that they'll be voting on his RAISE and CONTRACT EXTENSION. All of this while they're discussing cuts and a huge budget deficit. For Lewis to demand (yes, demand) a raise right now is unconscionable. For the Board to agree to it is reprehensible.

Anonymous said...

However, Crawford Lewis deserves a descend pay for his services compared to the supers from other metro counties. He is black and they are white and I think it is a little unfair to expect him to not be treated and paid equal.

We are in DeKalb County.

Anonymous said...

Anon

In the past 5 years, Dr. Lewis has seen his pay almost double. One of DeKalb's biggest errors, since it is one of the 25 largest school systems in the country, was to hire a Super. who had never been one before.

If, we do the correct thing next time, and hire a Super. from say the 75th largest school system, and that person's salary is $X, we can fully expect to pay that person $X+.

If he were to move on then his current salary would set expectations for what his salary should be. However, his previous salary sets the expectation of what he should earn now.

By the way, the Clayton Super., who walked into one of the country's most missed up school systems, is African American.

Wilbanks has been a Super in Gwinnett forever. CL sticks around that long and his salary will reflect that. In addition, Gwinnett has 50 percent more students than DeKalb.

Anonymous said...

To Anon 4:20 12/25:

Dr. Lewis's salary should have nothing to do with his pigmentation and everything to do with our children's education.

Cerebration said...

My 2010 goal -- no race-based discussions.

Edmond Heatley, new superintendent of Clayton Co - is black.

Beverly Hall - superintendent of Atlanta PS - is black.

Our county CEO is black.

The mayor of Atlanta is black.

C'mon. Lewis asking for a raise is controversial not because of his race, but because of the fact that he made heavy cuts to teachers and bus drivers as well as others pay - in the form of denying their STEP increases, making them take unpaid furlough days and general cuts to the work schedule. To then demand a raise for himself just looks bad and people are upset about it.

If you do, however, wish to talk about race, and fair representation of such, then let's chat about how very few Hispanics we employ in the school system - when our Hispanic student population is approaching 10% - almost as many Hispanics as whites.

This will be my 2010 mantra. Every time someone mentions race in DCSS, they will get my response in support of hiring more HIspanics in positions of respect.

Anonymous said...

Cerebration, didn't you just violate your own mantra for 2010? Insisting that Hispanics be hired for the sake of having more Hispanic employees is just as wrong as buying into the black-white controversy.

How about this: The DCSS should always hire the MOST QUALIFIED individual to fill positions without regard to race, sex, culture, national origin, sexual orientation, nepotism, etc.

Cerebration said...

Touche! I just get tired of the discussion always leading back to a black/white race issue (ala Gene Walker at about every board meeting) -- and if anyone truly insists on "going there" - the Hispanic argument is the only one that seems to tamp down the complaining. (Be careful what you complain about - it may be compared to how you actually behave.)

Dunwoody Mom said...

I heard a rumor that Dunwoody High School has requested permission to move away from the 4 x4 block schedule. Hopefully, someone else can verify this.

Anonymous said...

Dunwoody has requested to do a modified A B, which still leaves the problem of 90 minute periods. As you can see from this chart, only Tucker and Dunwoody are changing!

https://eboard.eboardsolutions.com/meetings/TempFolder/Meetings/Block%20Schedule%20Survey%20Results_214247jb10wd45gn3ywivcksjlghup.pdf

Dunwoody Mom said...

What is the difference between the straight A/B block that DSA employs and a modified A/B block? There are some classes that bode well with a 90-minute period, i.e. science - it gives the students time to get their labs done without being rushed.

Dunwoody Mom said...

Never mind, I got the answer.

https://eboard.eboardsolutions.com/meetings/TempFolder/Meetings/Schedule%20Definitions_213610fb2lvcqlxhtxqa45ixwnap45.pdf

Kim Gokce said...

@Dunwoody Mom: "Why are booster clubs paying for equipment? I thought DCSS pays for those type of things? I certainly have seen items on the BOE agenda related to authorizing payment."

I think DCSS does pay but it doesn't cover the full amount required. Most team sports require some sort of participant fee to help defray costs of running the program. At schools like Cross Keys, this is not always realistic due to economic status of families. So while uniforms, pads, etc. may be paid for at CKHS football, they have little left over for niceties like trainers, medical, supplies, etc. I don't know but suspect that many players are "sponsored" by their coaches and pay only reduced participation fees. The student athletes themselves run ongoing fund-raising efforts to keep their programs running at CKHS.

On the broader questions about our area enrollment/facilities/balancing, etc., ... I have to add that the existing attendance areas are not as they are by accident - no one wants my students.

I have received personal communication to this effect and have every reason to believe these are not isolated perspectives. I've seen this on meeting minutes from civic groups. Surrounding neighborhoods that now are in attendance areas for Chamblee, Lakeside, and Druid Hills would storm DCSS HQ with pitch forks and torches if they tried to move their homes into Cross Keys attendance area.

So, while I personally agree that enrollment re-balancing is the most logical, economical and ethical thing to do, I do not believe there is the political will to do so. I hope I'm wrong and the BoE and Superintendent make bold and courageous decisions on behalf of all students and all citizens.

Given that reality, the only way I see a significant change for CKHS in the future would be for a completely new mega-school to be built in this region to absorb all of Chamblee, Cross Keys, and perhaps pieces of Druid Hills and Lakeside. Then, no neighborhood could lobby their way out of having "those kids" in their area school.

Even in that case, trust me, there would be blood in the street to be districted out of the "Buford Hwy" school zone.

I have committed myself to work for the benefit of CKHS attendance area schools "as-is" and want to make them the best possible schools they can be for the kids that are living and breathing there now! They deserve it and it is the right thing to do regardless of what happens at the top.

Anonymous said...

Dunwoody Mom- The A/B Block schedule would be my preference and I hope you will be very happy with it! Most of the high performing Fulton county schools use this schedule.

My child attends a school on the 7 period schedule which is good, but has some drawbacks for classes that need extra time for labs or art.

The fact that the administration and/or Board does not REQUIRE schools to drop the 4x4 block is crazy. Of course the students all vote to keep it. They never, never have any homework. The block scheduling and rampant grade inflation are two major reasons Crawford Lewis needs to go. He does not have the vision or courage to make the hard decisions

Anonymous said...

Actually, most Fulton schools are now 7 periods -- many were never on the block at all. Fulton officials decided several years ago that they couldn't afford the block. Along with many other school systems, Fulton has mostly dropped the block. I can't understand how DeKalb can either afford to keep it or argue that it actually costs less. I understand that the 4 by 4 utilizes fewer textbooks, but other than that, I think that more teachers are required to have 8 credits a year for every student rather than 7.

Someone correct me, please, if I am wrong.

Cerebration said...

Personally, I think the issue with the 7 period day is that carrying a load of 7 classes - with the accompanying homework and tests - is grueling. At Lakeside, ALL teachers give a substantial amount of homework - even the art teacher. Most college students don't handle this heavy a load.

There certainly can be some kind of compromise -- maybe a modified block? Maybe a 6 period day? If DeKalb would adhere to state standards, only 23 credits would be required to graduate - DeKalb now insists on 24 (the extra one being in social studies). That would give students a chance to make 24 credits on a 6 period day - 23 required and one of one's choosing. (Perhaps we should encourage that one to be a money management/life skills type of course!)

Anonymous said...

It's easy. Up North, many school systems have a six period day/ seven class schedule. There is one extra long class in the middle of the day, and that class is skipped the next. That way, you get a long class for science projects, etc. it really, really works well.

Dunwoody Mom said...

The block scheduling and rampant grade inflation are two major reasons Crawford Lewis needs to go.

I'll take up for Dr. Lewis a bit on the schedule issue. I like the fact that individual schools have the option of creating their own academic schdule. As was explained at the meeting at DHS, schools are required to have 380 minutes of instruction per day and each school can come up with the type of schedule they feel best works for their students. Maybe, I am naive, but, I would assume, or hope, that the administrations and school councils at each school have gone a thorough process to determine which model works best for them.

Anonymous said...

Sorry Dunwoody Mom, but I seriously disagree. There is a reason why none of the private schools and few schools outside DCSS have the 4X4 block schedule. That is because the students do not cover sufficient material, they are not prepared for AP exams or the rigors of college, and most important for all students, the huge gaps between courses such as foreign language, math and language arts results in poor retention of academic material.


That is why we need a strong, independent leader from outside the system. That and we need someone with the courage to make hard decisions to curb the rampant administrative waste, hire experienced business professionals for business postions and close (I mean really close) the underutilized and chronic underperforming schools.

Remember the superintendent's contract is up for Board approval on Monday night.

Dunwoody Mom said...

What do you disagree with? That schools should not have the option of determing which academic model works best for them?

Anonymous said...

Dunwoody Mom: We may have to just agree that we disagree on this one. I think that making the decision based on a popularity survey is like letting your kids decide when their bedtime should be.

DCSS, and GA for that matter, don't need to be outliers. They should look at what the highest performing schools and school districts are doing and emulate that. The A/B modified block schedule offers a compromise to those schools that do not want the straight 7 period schedule.

Dunwoody Mom said...

They should look at what the highest performing schools and school districts are doing and emulate that.

But, aren't you assuming that all students are equal in this argument? One of the issues I have with No Child Left Behind is the cookie-cutter, one size fits all, approach to education. Students are different in every school and the academic model for that school should be built based upon the needs of that student bodey. What works at Dunwoody HS might not work at another school and what works at one high school may not work at Dunwoody. Schools should have the flexibility to determine what works best for their student body. JMHO.

Anonymous said...

They should look at what the highest performing schools and school districts are doing and emulate that.


The best performing schools and school districts may in fact be working to meet the needs of all students, something DCSS is not doing. Doing our own thing or what friends and family members are selling and tell the powers that be is what we should do isn't working, so emulating a school system that is actually educating all of it's students has to better than than the status quo.

Anonymous said...

Dunwoody Mom is right, one size doesn't fit all. BUT, for Dunwoody High School, a modified 7 period schedule probably is the better answer. However, the school administration continues to ignore the fact that many teachers aren't particularly effective in a 90 minute period.

Based on the most recent silly survey, DHS teachers indicated that 73 percent of them believe that teachers could use more training to effective teach in a block. This percentage is actually higher (it was 70 percent) then when teachers answered the same survey 3 years ago. This is an ongoing issue at Dunwoody and it isn't getting any better.

I think Dunwoody students would be better served with shorter instructional periods.

Anonymous said...

What is a modified 7 period schedule?

Anonymous said...

There still could be choice, 7 period, modified 7 period or A/B Block. Just eliminate the 4X4 or other schedules where students do not take core courses for the entire year.

Cerebration said...

I think the "modified 7 periods" consist of more or less a "rolling" schedule. This is used by several private schools (Pace is one, I think) - where you have 7 classes, but only go to 5 or 6 each day - and the daily schedule changes several times a week. It's not as draining on teachers and students as attending or teaching 7 periods every day.

Anonymous said...

"Very interesting increases in capacity for a school system that seems to be shrinking."

You are looking at the "bulge" of students that is moving through the system. Elementary enrollments will decrease, then middle school as the the "bulge" works its way through high school-it's just a demographic accidentbut one foreseen by many demographers.

Anonymous said...

Although I personally believe that each school should set its own schedule based on the needs of the students, school schedules affect the ease of student transfers, the school budget and the busing schedule.

There is little conclusive research in favor of any schedule except that in the case of larger schools fewer class changes positively affect discipline incidents (fewer opportunities in the halls)and provide failing students with more opportunity to make up courses (notice I said opportunities). High performing students in several studies handle any schedule. The AB block is a simple schedule and easy to explain. Most schools prefer a modified block that changes from day to day or allows some daily classes.

Anonymous said...

I do not think that the surveys of students on the block make any difference as to the course of action. Although the surveys are required by school board edict-there is little evidence that they matter except as information.

The principal and the faculty determine the schedule type and the changes in schedule based on a separate vote as mandated by the school board.

Cerebration said...

Capacity though, is how many students a building holds. Enrollments are hard numbers - I really only go by the October head counts.

It's strange, but those capacity numbers keep fluctuating wildly. I don't know if they are recalculating class sizes or adding in trailer capacities or what. For the most part, the building capacities have gone down. But they keep building new schools and additions. I have a feeling that the numbers have been "tweaked" in order to provide reasoning for the new construction. But it's just a hypothesis.

Now - I see that the Planning Department's website isn't even available anymore. I would assume that's because they finally realized how incredibly messed up their numbers were. No explanation though. Try clicking on planning - it just takes you to the operations home page - not to the planning site with all the data. Poof!

Anonymous said...

"473 "Instructional Specialists" totaling $23.9 million." You might ask for a definition of the category. I think it is misleading.

In fact, I suggest Instructional specialists are primarily classroom teachers.

In the jargon of teaching an instructional specialist is someone who has a degree certification Ed.S. I quote from one of the state universities web sites-

Educational Specialist Degrees
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degree for educator preparation programs is a terminal degree program that advances educators in their instructional and leadership skills beyond the master's level of competence. The purpose of this applied degree is to extend the academic preparation and teaching skills of experienced classroom teachers and instructional leaders and to foster the application of these skills and abilities to a variety of educational settings.

Early Childhood Education
The Specialist in Education degree (Ed.S.) offered by the Department of Early Childhood Education is designed to prepare educational leaders who can make a difference in their school communities. Coursework, extensive internship experiences, and collaboration among school and university faculty combine to develop a program that supports and extends the professional growth of each candidate.
School Counseling
The program for the major in school counseling (elementary, middle childhood, or secondary) prepares counselors to function at higher levels of competence in their work settings. A master's-level certification in school counseling is a prerequisite for the program.
School Psychology
The professional in school psychology is educated in the major disciplines of education and psychology. He or she is equipped to undertake and manage processes and problems related to the education and development of children within schools. A major portion of his or her training concerns the interaction of the child with the social institution of the school. Because of this special orientation, the school psychologist has to be well grounded in the philosophy and methods of education and must achieve a high level of understanding of psychological processes such as learning, personality, and social competence.

Teaching and Learning
The Educational Specialist degree is a unique professional degree in the field of education, a degree that reflects a high level of knowledge and expertise. The Ed.S. program with a major in Teaching and Learning is intended for professional educators who demonstrate high levels of expertise in their areas of concentration and who wish both to develop those areas further and to develop themselves as inquirers, program leaders, and instructional specialists. The Educational Specialist degree consists of the following concentration areas:

Art Education
English as a Second Language (ESOL)
English Education
Foreign Language
Instructional Technology
Library Media Technology
Mathematics Education
Middle Childhood Education
Music Education
Reading Education
Science Education
Social Studies Education

Anonymous said...

PS

I am one

Cerebration said...

Interesting, Anon. So you're saying that you are actually a classroom teacher, but that your job description is "Instructional Specialist"?

The salary listing categorizes teachers as Lottery Pre-K teacher, Kindergarten teacher, then each grade level (example Grade 1 teacher) then 6-8 and 9-12 and psych-ed teacher, special ed teacher, etc.

But you are saying that the "Instructional Specialists" are actually teachers teaching a class? If so - then I stand corrected. I have no issue with teachers. I just don't think they need a "Specialist" hovering over them telling them how to teach the curriculum. I was told that was what they do.

So - is that perhaps what the Instructional Supervisors do? Or are they also actually teachers as well?

Anonymous said...

Instructional specialists are typically teachers who, as members of ODE, sucked up and toted the water so as to get cushy jobs at the County Office doing nothing.

Anonymous said...

@Anon 4:55
Point of clarification - your graduate degree does not automatically equate to your job title. Teachers, support staff etc can hold an Education Specialist degree which is the equivalent of ABD (All but Dissertation) but not be classified as Instructional Specialists or Supervisors. There are also some individuals identified as Instructional Supervisors who only hold a Master's degree.

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:20 is spot on about DCSS instructional specialists. Trust me.

We cut lay off every single one and save tens of millions, and you would never notice they are gone.

Lefty said...

If Instructional Specialists include foreign language teachers, music teachers, art teachers, ESOL teachers, reading intervention teachers, etc. then these are valuable members of the school teams.

Molly said...

So Crawford got a 27 month extension of his contract, a $15,000 raise (up to $255,000), plus a monthly expense account of $2500 a month and $1250 a month to his tax-sheltered annuity. (For comparison sake, the Governor of Georgia earns a salary of $139,339.44.)

Cerebration said...

Well then, I don't understand why Paul Womack had to state that it was only $500 different from the 2007 contract. Although he did say, "As it reads." I guess he means that most of the increase was in expense account and annuity contributions. That's a set-up to encourage him not to retire - otherwise, a straight up raise equal to those numbers (a $45,000 annual value) plus the $15,000 raise ($60,000 total) would have definitely encouraged him to retire - with a nice inflated pension. If you're going to give him more, I guess this was the smartest way to do it - give him $3750 a month that goes away when he does. Only give him a basic $15,000 raise that calculates into his pension.

Even so, this is not going to be good for employee morale. Especially the part about the annuity contribution - since teachers all lost theirs.

Say, has our school system made AYP yet?

Kim Gokce said...

The AJC coverage by Megan Matteucci came through Community Radar last night:

DeKalb superintendent gets $15,000 raise

Some quotes:

'Board member H. Paul Womack argued Monday that the $255,000 cost is only $500 more than the amount approved for Lewis’ compensation package in 2007.

“We just basically restored what was in the original contract,” he said, “and this is locked in for three years.”

Womack said the raise is fair and necessary to hold on to Lewis, who has already received two job offers with higher salaries.

“If you look at his goals, he rang the bell on each one he was supposed to do. He has 100 percent,” Womack said. “We’ve invested a lot of money in him, and I expect to get a return on him.”'

Cerebration said...

What goals were those that he "rang the bell" on?

The inmates have taken over the asylum.

Below is a listing of recent school system blunders -- completely overlooked by an inert board -

A boy commits suicide. His family says it was due to bullying at school. Instead of hiring an actual investigator, Lewis hires a retired judge at $325/hour to investigate. Pays the judge nearly a half-million dollars in total. The judge declares there is no bullying and instead of providing the promised public "report", claims attorney-client privilege. All is well.

The marines offer to set up an academy in our school system. Lewis chooses to rush it through, attempting to squeeze this school for up to 700 high school students into a building that - with only 18 classrooms - holds about 300 elementary students. However, it has been used for years as a school for very high needs special ed students - who are happy there. Lewis closes their school to make way for the military and merges them with a high school for special needs. (These students will now attend the SAME school from Pre-k - graduation!) The military backs out of the deal. The building now sits empty causing blight in the neighborhood.

Lewis buys a car from surplus on the cheap. Gets caught. Blames Pat Pope. Pope - we find - also bought one. Lewis calls for an investigation into Pope. The DA storms Pope's offices - twice. Not sure how many millions this is costing in legal fees.

Heery/Mitchell sues DCSS for the remainder of their SPLOST 2 billings. (Somewhere around a half-million dollars.) Lewis hires an independent company to do a study to determine how much to countersue for. The "study" costs over $3.5 million and concludes that the system should countersue for between $85-120 million. So far, attorney's fees on this lawsuit (which is set to begin trial in March) is well over $12 million. (Over a $500,000 claim.)

A principal is caught cheating on his 5th grade students CRCT tests. He lies about it. But is finally cornered and confesses. Lewis sends an email out countywide asking all employees to send the principal and his AP a note of sympathy.

A high school teacher claims that a sub changed her students failing grades to passing while she was on maternity leave. Lewis does not give her credibility.

Lewis' right hand technology man implements a new student information system that is full of flaws and continually crashes on teachers as they attempt to upload files. Lewis calls the system a success and gives his man a raise and a promotion.

Cross Keys HS, a school comprised of mainly HIspanic and other immigrants sits in absolute squalor and decay and has known issues with asbestos and mold - while Lewis and Pope spend, spend, spend on glamourous new buildings and improvements for schools in other areas.

Additionally, he and Pope decide to close the schools on the North Druid Hills property (the one developers are salivating over) due to asbestos. We now have over 50 acres of boarded up buildings - causing blight.

They built themselves gorgeous new offices and facilities (along with a workout facility using grant money!) and have left the A/B buildings on North Decatur Road nearly unused and closed for the most part - causing blight.*

And now, after decimating teacher's pay and pensions - has the gall to demand an increase in his own package, claiming he deserves it because he is not a "rookie".

There's more, but you get the drill. And our board gave this guy a raise. Pitiful.

Kim Gokce said...

I have to add that I think Mr. Womack's comments are completely without merit in this case. Doing what is expected or committed to is called "doing your duty" on the job and in no way merits an increase.

Mr. Womack is correct in one regard. In the private sector, executive leaders routinely receive pay increases, non-cash, and deferred compensation whether or not their organizations succeed. I do not believe that should be the standard for our public schools leadership.

If these increases were deferred by Dr. Lewis 2 years ago, there are even more reasons today to do so again.

Anonymous said...

And the morale of teachers, teacher assistants, and others just trying to do the best job that they can gets lower as Lewis' wallet gets fatter.

sickntired said...

DeKalb teachers have got to complain much more, picket, and express to the public how we feel about our leadership or lack thereof. The same man that had the nerve to ask us to take a pay cut asked for a raise for himself - how hypocritical!

Anonymous said...

Just heard today that eSIS wasn't working yesterday (teacher workday) and was down today, because it couldn't handle that many teachers logging on to it en masse. So report cards may not go out in time, and there is some concern about mid-year reports for college applicants (no eSIS=no transcripts). I think the Board may need to save the money from Crawford's raise to pay for the defense and settlement of the class action lawsuit they will be looking at.

Anonymous said...

http://blogs.ajc.com/get-schooled-blog/2010/01/05/dekalb-vote-to-raise-superintendents-salary-was-mistake/

Wow, the AJC's Maureen Downey, a county resident, really let crawford have it for the big increase he demanded. Imagine if we had a Board of Ed that would have caled his bluff?

Anonymous said...

Why is no one complaining about the extra $2500 month expense account that Clew have to account for?

As for a teacher, a 10 year veteran, for right now I am done. If CLew has taught me is to protect my back pocket. I have been a fortunate teacher. I had extra money that I spent for years on students who could not afford paper, pens, pencil, crayons and notebooks. Well no more. I can't keep giving and giving when I am putting my family second. Well, that has no ended. My family comes first! My kids are finally going to have that vacation.

I know many teachers that went back and returned items that they had bought for their students.

The sad thing is the students are going to fail. Well the school board and the school system and our over paid leader failed us.

Call me self centered, but I am tired of have to sit in a cold classroom daily, a copier that does not work, eSHIT that does not work. Over paid administrators that do not return emails. What the h#ll am I saying they don't even read them. (Yes, I still have the history on the emails that I have sent Mr. Tony Hunter and others) I am tired about the news reporting that Stone Mountian students do not have heat. What about HMS students not having PE because the lockers rooms are being pumped full of air conditioning? What about LHS not having heat in their building? What about all the swimmers at LHS who nearly froze to death last night in a cold room with cold water? We are so lucky that someone did not get a cramp and drown.

Call me bitter. I have worked, sacrificed, put my job before my family for years and this is how the school board is going to thank me. Well this is a "Thank You" that I did not need at this time.

Yesterday at school when we (several teachers and a para pro) were talking. When we made the comment about how high our property taxes and how much of our taxes go to the school system we could save so much if we just cut out the bloat. There was a "soccer mom" who was there and did not realize that property taxes go to the school system.

We need to educate people. Go and ask your neighbor who your school board members are. 9 out of 10 can not tell you. That is sad. We need to educate everyone. I hope that this blog is doing that.

I do want to apolgize for any misspelling or sentences that do not make any sense. My eyes are tired from watching the eSHIT screen not move for 3 days now.

Anonymous said...

Cere, if you have any pull, the AJC Education reporter and DeKalb bureau reporters needs to hear about Stone Mountain and the other schools without heat.

Cerebration said...

Sh*t. How dumb is that soccer mom? I can't believe she didn't even bother to read the LETTERS from the county commission that have arrived in her mailbox with her tax bill (regardless of whether your mortgage company pays it). The county commissioners desperately want you to know that around 75% of your property tax bill goes directly to the school system. Not to mention - half the state budget goes to schools too! Damn, politicians count on people like her to get away with all they do.

Either she's a complete idiot - or she rents.

Sorry - I'm just mortified.

Cerebration said...

BTW - all those concerned about schools - heat - poor conditions - unhealthy buildings - little equipment or support - write an email to these reporters - these are the ones who listen -

Maureen Downey - AJC -
e-mail her at mdowney@ajc.com
or call her at 404 526-5445

Ty Tygami - AJC -
ttagami@ajc.com

Christian Boone
Reporter, AJC
cboone@ajc.com
404-526-5177

Richard Belcher - WSB Channel 2
Richard.Belcher@wsbtv.com

Diana Davis - WSB Channel 2
diana.davis@wsbtv.com

Jennifer Ffrench Parker
Crossroads News
news@crossroadsnews.com

Jonathan Cribbs
The Champion
404.373.7779
or send an email to
Kathy@dekalbchamp.com

Jonathan Shapiro - NPR Radio
jonathan.m.shapiro@gmail.com

Anonymous said...

No she is one of Oak Grove's finest. Living in a huge house off of Oak Grove Road.

Anonymous said...

Why is DeKalb County's BOE giving Crawford Lewis a $15,000 raise when the state reports his 2009 salary at $287,991.63?? That's right! Check it out on www.open.georgia.gov. You can also see where a lot of wasteful spending is occuring--principals spending $1,000-$3,000+ on travel! Where the 'h' do they need to go?? And Crawford Lewis spending $9,452.75 on travel--I guess to see his mother in Monticello.